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Asparagus needs a bit more attention when planting and a fair amount of patience before you start enjoying eight weeks of tasty spears every spring. Even home gardeners in the South and West, where winters are considered to be too warm for developing asparagus, can plant the new asparagus varieties.

Don’t plant until the ground is at least 50 degrees or more. When the time is good for planting, dig a pit roughly 6 inches deep and 10 to 20 inches wide. Space rows 4 to 5 feet apart. Spread around 1 lb. of phosphate per 50 feet of row in the base of each pit. Space the crowns bud side up in the trench about 1½ feet apart, dispersing the roots out throughout the pit.

The health benefits in growing asparagus are definitely important. It is high in saponins (glycosides) and so will have many of the same strengths as Ginseng. The key is not to over-cook it. Stop cooking as soon as the spears go a vivid emerald green – if they turn a flat olive color, that’s too much. Actually many asparagus breeders even save the water the spears were cooked in and drink it as an organic tea. Obviously, the best thing is to eat asparagus raw in salads, and so on.

When to harvest? Do not harvest any spears from the plants in the first year. They may be harvested lightly, for about 2-4 weeks, in the second year.

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Healthy, tasty and juicy cucumbers are one of the most common and loved garden crops. They are also developing fast and involve minimal maintenance. Go along with these simple guidelines to get your cucumbers started off.

Prepare the Soil
For the most tasteful cucumbers and optimum turnout, you’ll want to cultivate plants in a sunny spot and in well-drained soil enhanced with nutrient improved substance like Miracle-Gro® Garden Soil for Flowers & Vegetables.

Plant Your Cucumbers
Sow your cucumber plant seeds straight on the soil in the early spring, but following the danger of returning frost. Cucumbers can be developed up trellises, in rows, or on small slopes. If rising in rows or up trellises, plant seeds 6 to 9 inches separated. If planting on hills, start with 5 to 7 seeds per hill and lean seedlings to 2 to 3 per hill after true leaves come up. Hills should be in gaps 2 to 3 feet away.

Help Your Cucumbers Grow
Cucumber plants want plenty of humidity, particularly when the plant is blooming. Any water stress in this period can lead to bitter-tasting cucumbers to develop. Cucumbers favor a continuously moist soil, so soak the soil as necessary based on the weather and your soil design. Training cucumber vines up a trellis or some other sustains causes the best use of garden space and delivers better-looking cucumbers. This will also help to keep pests and diseases away.

Harvest Your Cucumbers
It’s time to enjoy your achievements. If you’re cropping your cucumbers for slicing, they can be collected when they are 6 to 8 inches in length. For pickling choices, harvest them when they are small; for example – 1/2 inch to 3 inches for sweet pickles and larger for dills. Be certain to cut them off the vine with a sharp knife or shears to avoid breaking up the stem.

Pick Often for an Abundant Crop
Be ready to pick your cucumbers every day once they start to come to from. Picking regularly will increase cucumber development and growth, and leaving even a few on the vine can stop the set of new cucumbers.

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Compost identifies the end solution of a practice concerning the breakdown of numerous materials (e.g. leaves, manure, food leftovers) into a more practical form (e.g. fertilizer for your backyard).

This breakdown takes place mainly because of the biological activity in your compost pile, bin, or tumbler. Organic activity suggests of billions of soil microorganisms (e.g. bacteria and fungi) working collectively to consume, digest, and excrete each component in your heap. Once this step of consume, digest, and excrete happens about 10 billion times, you’ll be left with lovely soil to use as you desire.

The key point making excellent compost is retaining all of your soil microorganisms in great conditions after you build a compost pile. This is one of the tricks to composting truly well. As long as these little components have water, oxygen, and the right harmony of compost elements, they’ll be quite content, and will make you very good compost. Without adequate humidity, you’ll be dry composting – a very sluggish practice. With too much humidity, you’ll drown the little organisms and generate a stinky mess. Without plenty of oxygen, you’ll be anaerobic composting, which can end up with a stinky, less than ideal solution (if not done properly). And with too much oxygen, your compost pile may never really build needed heat to breakdown.

Thanks to: https://www.epa.gov/recycle/composting-home

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The three primary elements that a composter requires are heat, oxygen, and moisture. The optimum location for your composter is in a place where there is maximum sun during the day. The black barrel will help to absorb heat all day and hold it throughout the night, and should not cool down as much as an open heap or bin, protecting the composting operation.

Use half and half mix of Kitchen (Greens) materials and Yard (Brown) waste in your composter.

Do not use the soil itself or any fertilizer at all. Also ignore any other materials other than garden and kitchen leftovers.

Compost is the extracted remains of organic materials that means it’s what you get when you blend the leftovers of plant and animal-based elements, add a little air, water and nitrogen. The decomposition is carried out primarily by aerobes (microorganisms with oxygen-based metabolism), while larger creatures such as ants, nematodes, and worms can also play a role in the process. This decomposition takes place naturally except for in intense conditions, like in landfills, very dry deserts or cold weather such as cold winters or polar regions that avert the microbes and other decomposers from growing.

Decomposition occurs even in the lack of some of these ingredients, but not as fast or as nicely. Compost is used quite frequently at the individual level in gardening and agriculture as a fertilizer-type soil component, and can also typically substitute commercial fertilizers.

Compost can also show a key aspect in the food cycle, uncover valuable lessons in the life of soil and the value of its inhabitants, and presents the opportunity to teach gardener, or pretty much anyone about the recycling of organic waste.

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